Saturday, April 30, 2016


...Attracting Butterflies to Your Backyard 

Melitaea athalia, Mélitée du mélampyre ou Damier Athalie, Heath Fritillary


Protect your butterflies from the wind.

If your backyard is subject to breezy conditions, think about how you can provide the butterflies with protection from the wind. If it takes a lot of energy for the butterflies to battle the wind currents in your backyard habitat, the site won't be as beneficial to them for gathering nectar.


Melitaea athalia, Mélitée du mélampyre ou Damier Athalie, Heath Fritillar


Try to site your nectar and host plants where the house, a fence, or a line of trees will buffer the wind. If needed, provide a windbreak by planting taller shrubs or trees to block the prevailing winds from your butterfly garden.


Melitaea athalia, Mélitée du mélampyre ou Damier Athalie, Heath Fritillary

Melitaea athalia, Mélitée du mélampyre ou Damier Athalie, Heath Fritillary




read more "02 - 10 Tips for..."

Tuesday, January 26, 2016



...Attracting Butterflies to Your Backyard 

Choose a sunny site 
Butterflies are the ultimate sun worshipers. If you've spent any time observing butterflies at all, you know they spend some of their time basking in the sunshine. Like all insects, butterflies are ectotherms, meaning they can't regulate their body temperatures internally. Instead, they rely on the sun's energy to warm their bodies so they can function. This is especially important on cooler days, because butterflies can't fly when the temperatures dip below about 55° Fahrenheit.

You'll see a butterfly perched on a rock or leaf in a sunny spot, with its wings extended, warming up its flight muscles. When you're planning your butterfly habitat, think about providing good basking spots in the sunniest areas of your yard.


In addition, most good nectar plants require partial to full sun. Plant your butterfly garden in an area that gets a solid 6 hours or more of sunshine every day. Pay attention to the seasonal changes, too. The best site for a butterfly garden will get lots of sun from early spring to late fall, not just in the summer months.
read more "01- 10 Tips for... "

Monday, January 25, 2016


...butterfly, Melanargia galathea, accounts for glacial distribution patterns and postglacial range expansion in southeastern Europe

Isolation of Mediterranean species in the southern European peninsulas during the cold glacial phases often resulted in differentiation of several genetic lineages confined to the respective peninsulas. However, whilst there is good genetic evidence for multiple refugia in Iberia, there are only limited data available for the Balkans. Therefore, we wish to examine the hypothesis of a strong genetic structuring within southeastern Europe for the existence of multiple Balkan differentiation centres and/or several leading edges. As a model we use the marbled white butterfly, Melanargia galathea.





We studied 18 allozyme loci of 564 individuals from 16 populations distributed over a large part of southeastern Europe. The single populations showed moderately high genetic diversity and no northward decline of genetic diversity was detected. The overall genetic differentiation between populations was considerable (FST 7.0%). Cluster analysis discriminated three genetic groups: (i) a western flank in the former Yugoslavia, parts of eastern Austria and Hungary; (ii) an eastern flank with populations from Bulgaria and Romania (south of the southern Carpathians and eastern Carpathians); and (iii) the eastern Carpathian Basin. 




Hierarchical variance analysis distributed 53% of the variance among populations between these three groups. One sample from the Greek–Bulgarian border clustered within the eastern flank, but showed some tendency towards the eastern Carpathian Basin populations. Two populations from Carinthia clustered together with the eastern Carpathian Basin ones and a population from Styria showed an intermediate genetic composition between the three groups. Most probably, the eastern and the western flank groups are due to postglacial range expansion from the northeastern and the northwestern edges of the glacial differentiation centre (so-called leading edges).


The eastern Carpathian Basin group may have resulted from postglacial expansion from northern Greece through valley systems of the central Balkan peninsula, maybe even expanding westwards north of the Balkan mountains reaching some parts of eastern Austria (e.g. Carinthia). Therefore, the Balkanic refugium of M. galathea may or may not have been continuous along the coastal areas of the Mediterranean, but must have been strongly genetically structured.

-->  http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/j.1365-294X.2006.02900.x/abstract

read more "Genetic differentiation of the marbled white..."

Thursday, January 14, 2016


Merle noir, Turdus merula, Common blackbird

read more "Merle noir, Turdus merula, Common blackbird"

Mésange charbonnière, Parus major, Great tit

read more "Mésange charbonnière, Parus major, Great tit"

Saturday, January 9, 2016


Geai des chênes, Garrulus glandarius, Eurasian jay

read more "Geai des chênes, Garrulus glandarius, Eurasian jay"

Friday, January 8, 2016


  Mésange bleue, Cyanistes caeruleus, Eurasian blue tit

 Mésange bleue, Cyanistes caeruleus, Eurasian blue tit






read more " Mésange bleue, Cyanistes caeruleus, Eurasian blue tit"

Thursday, January 7, 2016


Sitta europaea, Sittelle torchepot, Eurasian nuthatch

Sitta europaea, Sittelle torchepot, Eurasian nuthatch

Sitta europaea, Sittelle torchepot, Eurasian nuthatch

Sitta europaea, Sittelle torchepot, Eurasian nuthatch

Sitta europaea, Sittelle torchepot, Eurasian nuthatch

Sitta europaea, Sittelle torchepot, Eurasian nuthatch

Sitta europaea, Sittelle torchepot, Eurasian nuthatch

read more "Sitta europaea, Sittelle torchepot"

Wednesday, January 6, 2016


Coenonympha glycerion, Fadet de la mélique ou Iphis/Semi-Procris, Chestnut Heath

Coenonympha glycerion, Fadet de la mélique ou Iphis/Semi-Procris, Chestnut Heath
Coenonympha glycerion, Fadet de la mélique ou Iphis/Semi-Procris, Chestnut Heath

read more "Coenonympha glycerion, Fadet de la mélique"

Sunday, December 6, 2015


Polyommatus amandus, Azuré de la jarosse, Amanda's Blue
Butterflies have very brief life spans. Some - usually the ones found in the Tropics - can live up to a year, but others live anywhere from a few months to a few weeks to even a few hours.

Polyommatus amandus, Azuré de la jarosse, Amanda's Blue

Polyommatus amandus, Azuré de la jarosse, Amanda's Blue

read more "Complete Facts And Trivia About Butterflies 10/10"

Sunday, August 30, 2015


Many butterflies migrate in order to avoid adverse environmental conditions (like cold weather). Butterfly migration is not well understood. Some can migrate only short distances but others migrate thousands of miles.

Thymelicus Sylvestris, Small Skipper

read more "Complete Facts And Trivia About Butterflies 09/10"

Thursday, August 20, 2015


Male butterflies are often attracted to females by the release of a powerful chemical called 'pheromone' from special glands. Some Butterflies lay their eggs on the underside of specific plants, others lay them in mid-flight. Some Butterflies, like the Cabbage White Butterfly, lay their eggs on cabbage leaves - the eggs and the caterpillars that emerge presently are velvety green and blend in well with the cabbage leaves.
http://animalbreed-factstrivia.blogspot.co.at/2010/11/about-butterfly.html/

Melanargia Galathea, Demi-Deuil, Marbled White

Melanargia Galathea, Demi-Deuil, Marbled White

read more "Complete Facts And Trivia About Butterflies 08/10"

Saturday, June 6, 2015


Butterflies don't have mouths that allow them to bite or chew. They, along with most moths have a long straw like structure called a proboscis which they use to drink nectar and juices. When not in use, the proboscis remains coiled like a garden hose. Butterflies use their antennas to smell.

Cuivré des marais, Lycaena dispar, Large Copper

read more "Complete Facts And Trivia About Butterflies 07/10"

Sunday, May 31, 2015



Butterflies taste with their feet. Their taste sensors are located in the feet, and by standing on their food, they can taste it!
All butterflies have six legs and feet. In some species such as the monarch, the front pair of legs remains tucked up under the body most of the time, and are difficult to see. Pollen gets attached to the legs of the Butterfly and is carried from plant to plant, assisting in fertilization and the propagation of new seeds and plants.


Thymelicus sylvestris, Hespérie de la houque / Bande noire



read more "Complete Facts And Trivia About Butterflies 06/10"

Sunday, May 3, 2015


Both butterflies and moths belong to the order lepidoptera. In Greek, this means scale wing. The name 'Butterfly' was first coined to describe the Yellow Brimstone Butterfly, a variety commonly seen across Europe. It was actually known as 'Butter-colored Fly' and that later became 'Butterfly'.
/http://animalbreed-factstrivia.blogspot.co.at/2010/11/about-butterfly.html/


Lycaena tityrus, Cuivré fuligineux / Argus myope, Sooty Copper
Lycaena tityrus, Cuivré fuligineux / Argus myope, Sooty Copper

read more "Complete Facts and Trivia about Butterflies 05/10"

Saturday, April 25, 2015


Butterflies need an ideal body temperature of about 85ºF to fly. Since they're cold-blooded animals, they can't regulate their own body temperatures. The surrounding air temperature has a big impact on their ability to function. If the air temperature falls below 55ºF, butterflies are rendered immobile, unable to flee from predators or feed. When air temperatures range between 82º-100ºF, butterflies can fly with ease. Cooler days require a butterfly to warm up its flight muscles, either be shivering or basking in the sun. And even sun-loving butterflies can get overheated when temperatures soar above 100ºF, and may seek shade to cool down.
/http://insects.about.com/

Polyommatus Icarus, Argus Bleu , Common Blue

Polyommatus Icarus, Argus Bleu , Common Blue

read more "Complete Facts and Trivia about Butterflies 04/10"

Wednesday, April 22, 2015


Butterflies range in size from a tiny 1/8 inch to a huge 12 inches. They can fly up to the speed of 12 miles per hour and can only see the colours red, green, and yellow.
Butterfly wings are transparent. The iridescent scales, which overlap like shingles on a roof, give the wings the colors that we see. Contrary to popular belief, many butterflies can be held gently by the wings without harming the butterfly.

Melanargia Galathea, Demi-Deuil, Marbled White

read more "Complete Facts and Trivia about Butterflies 03/10"

Monday, April 20, 2015


Butterfly doesn't spin a cocoon. Caterpillars shed their final skin to reveal a pupa. The outer skin of this pupa hardens to form a chrysalis which protects and hides the amazing transformation that is occurring inside. Pupae take on a wide variety of appearances, depending on the species of butterfly. Some hang from beneath leaves or twigs. Others are girdled to the side of a stem much like a worker on a telephone pole. Some are smooth and shiny while others are rough and even spiky. Some are beautifully colored with dots and lines of gold while others are drab and barely noticeable. No matter what the design, the function is the same - to lessen the chances of being eaten by a predator and to increase the likelihood of producing an adult butterfly or moth.
/http://animalbreed-factstrivia.blogspot.co.at/2010/11/about-butterfly.html/

Polyommatus amandus, Azuré de la jarosse, Amanda's Blue

read more "Complete Facts and Trivia about Butterflies 02/10"

Sunday, April 19, 2015


There are about 28,000 known Butterfly species throughout the world.

Caterpillar grows to about 27,000 times the size it was when it first emerged from its egg. Because the caterpillar's skin doesn't grow along with it as ours does, it must periodically shed the skin as it becomes too tight. Most caterpillars molt five times before entering the pupa stage.

Caterpillars are boneless, but have over 1000 muscles. These muscles help the caterpillar move very quickly from place to place, and so both aid in finding new food and in escaping from predators. Butterflies are a valuable source of food for various birds, which are as necessary for maintaining the ecological balance.
/http://animalbreed-factstrivia.blogspot.co.at/2010/11/about-butterfly.html/

Coenonympha pamphilus, Fadet commun ou Procris, Small Heath

read more "Complete Facts and Trivia about Butterflies 01/10"
Related Posts Plugin for WordPress, Blogger...
 
Copyright © All Rights Reserved - Do Dema. Powered by Blogger.

Total Pageviews

Google+ Followers

Loading...

Visitors Since October 2012

Blog Archive