Sunday, May 3, 2015


Both butterflies and moths belong to the order lepidoptera. In Greek, this means scale wing. The name 'Butterfly' was first coined to describe the Yellow Brimstone Butterfly, a variety commonly seen across Europe. It was actually known as 'Butter-colored Fly' and that later became 'Butterfly'.
/http://animalbreed-factstrivia.blogspot.co.at/2010/11/about-butterfly.html/


Lycaena tityrus, Cuivré fuligineux / Argus myope, Sooty Copper
Lycaena tityrus, Cuivré fuligineux / Argus myope, Sooty Copper

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Saturday, April 25, 2015


Butterflies need an ideal body temperature of about 85ºF to fly. Since they're cold-blooded animals, they can't regulate their own body temperatures. The surrounding air temperature has a big impact on their ability to function. If the air temperature falls below 55ºF, butterflies are rendered immobile, unable to flee from predators or feed. When air temperatures range between 82º-100ºF, butterflies can fly with ease. Cooler days require a butterfly to warm up its flight muscles, either be shivering or basking in the sun. And even sun-loving butterflies can get overheated when temperatures soar above 100ºF, and may seek shade to cool down.
/http://insects.about.com/

Polyommatus Icarus, Argus Bleu , Common Blue

Polyommatus Icarus, Argus Bleu , Common Blue

read more "Complete Facts and Trivia about Butterflies 04/10"

Wednesday, April 22, 2015


Butterflies range in size from a tiny 1/8 inch to a huge 12 inches. They can fly up to the speed of 12 miles per hour and can only see the colours red, green, and yellow.
Butterfly wings are transparent. The iridescent scales, which overlap like shingles on a roof, give the wings the colors that we see. Contrary to popular belief, many butterflies can be held gently by the wings without harming the butterfly.

Melanargia Galathea, Demi-Deuil, Marbled White

read more "Complete Facts and Trivia about Butterflies 03/10"

Monday, April 20, 2015


Butterfly doesn't spin a cocoon. Caterpillars shed their final skin to reveal a pupa. The outer skin of this pupa hardens to form a chrysalis which protects and hides the amazing transformation that is occurring inside. Pupae take on a wide variety of appearances, depending on the species of butterfly. Some hang from beneath leaves or twigs. Others are girdled to the side of a stem much like a worker on a telephone pole. Some are smooth and shiny while others are rough and even spiky. Some are beautifully colored with dots and lines of gold while others are drab and barely noticeable. No matter what the design, the function is the same - to lessen the chances of being eaten by a predator and to increase the likelihood of producing an adult butterfly or moth.
/http://animalbreed-factstrivia.blogspot.co.at/2010/11/about-butterfly.html/

Polyommatus amandus, Azuré de la jarosse, Amanda's Blue

read more "Complete Facts and Trivia about Butterflies 02/10"

Sunday, April 19, 2015


There are about 28,000 known Butterfly species throughout the world.

Caterpillar grows to about 27,000 times the size it was when it first emerged from its egg. Because the caterpillar's skin doesn't grow along with it as ours does, it must periodically shed the skin as it becomes too tight. Most caterpillars molt five times before entering the pupa stage.

Caterpillars are boneless, but have over 1000 muscles. These muscles help the caterpillar move very quickly from place to place, and so both aid in finding new food and in escaping from predators. Butterflies are a valuable source of food for various birds, which are as necessary for maintaining the ecological balance.
/http://animalbreed-factstrivia.blogspot.co.at/2010/11/about-butterfly.html/

Coenonympha pamphilus, Fadet commun ou Procris, Small Heath

read more "Complete Facts and Trivia about Butterflies 01/10"

Saturday, April 18, 2015


A butterfly is a mainly day-flying insect of the order Lepidoptera, the butterflies and moths. Like other holometabolous insects, the butterfly's life cycle consists of four parts, egg, larva, pupa and adult. Most species are diurnal. Butterflies have large, often brightly coloured wings, and conspicuous, fluttering flight. Butterflies exhibit polymorphism, mimicry and aposematism. Some, like the Monarch, will migrate over long distances. Some butterflies have evolved symbiotic and parasitic relationships with social insects such as ants. Some species are pests because in their larval stages they can damage domestic crops or trees; however, some species are agents of pollination of some plants, and caterpillars of a few butterflies (e.g., Harvesters) eat harmful insects. Culturally, butterflies are a popular motif in the visual and literary arts.
/ http://animalbreed-factstrivia.blogspot.co.at/2010/11/about-butterfly.html /

Melanargia Galathea, Demi-Deuil, Marbled White

Melanargia Galathea, Demi-Deuil, Marbled White

read more "About Butterfly."

Thursday, April 16, 2015


Polyommatus Icarus, Argus Bleu, Common Blue

Polyommatus Icarus, Argus Bleu, Common Blue

Polyommatus Icarus, Argus Bleu, Common Blue

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Thursday, March 26, 2015


The Nickerl's fritillary (Melitaea aurelia) is a butterfly of the Nymphalidae family. It is found in Central Europe.The wingspan is 28–32 mm. The butterfly flies from June to August depending on the location. The larvae feed on Plantago lanceolata, Melampyrum pratense and yellow rattle.
Melitaea aurelia, Mélitée des digitales, Nickerl's fritillary


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Sunday, March 15, 2015


This golden skipper is often found basking on vegetation, or making short buzzing flights among tall grass stems. The male is distinguished from the female by the sex brand on its forewings, which is a slightly curved line of specialised scent scales. This species lives in discrete colonies of both small and large populations. /ukbutterflies.co.uk/

Thymelicus sylvestris, Hespérie de la houque / Bande noire

read more "Thymelicus Sylvestris, Small Skipper"

Saturday, March 14, 2015


Like other members of its subfamily, the larvae feed on various grasses. These include Phleum (Phleum pratense), Poa (Poa annua, Poa trivalis), Festuca rubra, Bromus erectus, Dactylis, Brachypodium pinnatum, Agrostis capillaris. It is thought that red fescue Festuca rubra is essential in their diet. /Wiki/

Melanargia Galathea, Demi-Deuil, Marbled White

Melanargia Galathea, Demi-Deuil, Marbled White


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Saturday, March 7, 2015


The Ringlet (Aphantopus hyperantus) is a butterfly in the family Nymphalidae. It is only one of the numerous "ringlet" butterflies in the tribe Satyrini. /Wiki/

Aphantopus hyperantus, Tristan (papillon),Ringlet
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Sunday, March 1, 2015



Caterpillar Foodplants
Common Bird's-foot-trefoil (Lotus corniculatus) is the main foodplant. Other plants used include: Greater Bird's-foot-trefoil (L. pedunculatus), Black Medick (Medicago lupulina), Common Restharrow (Ononis repens), White Clover (Trifolium repens), Lesser Trefoil (T. dubium).                                                                                                           
 Habitat 
Very common and found in a variety of habitats especially sunny sheltered spots. Examples of habitats include; downland, coastal dunes, undercliffs, road verges, acid grass and woodland clearings
It is also found on waste ground, disused pits and quarries, golf courses, and urban habitats such as cemeteries. 
/butterfly-conservation.org/                                                                                                                                               

Polyommatus Icarus, Argus Bleu ,Common Blue
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                           

read more "Polyommatus Icarus, Argus Bleu , Common Blue"

Sunday, February 22, 2015


 The green-veined white (Pieris napi) is a butterfly of the Pieridae family.
A circumboreal species widespread across Europe and Asia, including the Indian subcontinent, Japan and the Maghreb and North America. It is found in meadows, hedgerows and woodland glades but not as often in gardens and parks like its close relatives the large and small whites, for which it is often mistaken. Like other "white" butterflies, the sexes differ. The female has two spots on each forewing, the male only one. The veins on wings of the female are usually more heavily marked. The underside hindwings are pale yellow with the veins highlighted by black scales giving a greenish tint, hence green-veined white. Unlike the large and small whites two, it rarely chooses garden cabbages to lay its eggs on, preferring wild crucifers. Males emit a sex pheromone that is perceptible to humans, citral,the basic flavor-imparting component of lemon peel oil.

/Wiki/

Pieris napi, Piéride du navet, Green-veined white

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Monday, February 9, 2015


Wing upper side: Males shiny sky-blue, margins unclearly-edged black, wing veins close to margins black.
Females darker blue, edges dark brown or wings completely dark brown. Hind wing margin with red blotches.
Wing underside: Light grey (male) or light brown (female) with white-edged black blotches. Red blotches especially on margin of hind wing. Basal area of wings turquoise./www.luontoportti.com/

Polyommatus amandus, Azuré de la jarosse, Amanda's Blue

Polyommatus amandus, Azuré de la jarosse, Amanda's Blue



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Sunday, February 8, 2015



The Common Blue is found in a variety of grassy habitats particularly where the larval foodplants can be found in sunny sheltered positions. Many habitats are used including road verges woodland clearings disused railway lines quarries and coastal areas./www.britishbutterflies.co.uk/



Polyommatus Icarus, Argus Bleu , Common Blue
Polyommatus Icarus, Argus Bleu , Common Blue
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Wednesday, February 4, 2015


In the right habitat the Meadow Brown can be the most abundant butterfly on the wing. They are often seen in large numbers feeding on Bramble alongside other grassland species such as the Gatekeeper and Ringlet. Like the Ringlet the Meadow Brown will also fly in dull weather... even when its spotting with rain... when most other butterfly species are inactive.
/www.britishbutterflies.co.uk/

read more "Maniola jurtina, Myrtil, Meadow Brown"

Sunday, February 1, 2015


This butterfly flies from May to August. The larvae feed on species of vetch, often Meadow vetchling (Lathyrus pratensis) and tufted vetch (Vicia cracca). The males fly around near the hostplants waiting for femalesto arrive. The females lay their eggs singly on the leaves of the host plant. The caterpillars have glands which secrete a sugary fluid that attracts ants and the presence of these protects the larvae from predators.


Polyommatus amandus, Azuré de la jarosse, Amanda's Blue

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Monday, January 26, 2015


A freshly emerged Marbled White is among the most beautiful butterflies. Its distinctive chequered black and white pattern is very different to that of other Satyrines, most of which are patterned in shades of brown and orange. The pattern of the Marbled White is easily remembered by insectivorous birds, and is probably a form of aposematic coloration, functioning to advertise the toxic nature of the butterfly.
Melanargia Galathea, Demi-Deuil, Marbled White
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Saturday, January 24, 2015


Four specimens of this species have been found in the British Isles. The first was captured at Lee, near Ilfracombe, Devon in August 1887, the second in Kincardine-on-Forth near Fife, Scotland, the third (a female) by a schoolboy in Seaford, East Sussex, in August 1958, and the last at Grand Havre in Guernsey in August 1966. This species is not considered migratory. However, it is believed that the last two specimens could have been carried by the prevailing winds from the continent to the British Isles.


Lycaena tityrus, Cuivré fuligineux / Argus myope, Sooty Copper

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Thursday, January 22, 2015


The Large Copper is one of Europe's most beautiful butterflies, the dazzling iridescent copper wings of the male equalling in brilliance any species found in the tropics. The female is equally stunning, with a pattern similar to that of the Small Copper, but having almost double it's wingspan.

Lycaena Dispar, Cuivré Des Marais, Large Copper

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Saturday, January 17, 2015


The Small Heath  (Coenonympha pamphilus) is a butterfly species belonging to the family Nymphalidae, (subfamily Satyrinae, commonly known as "the Browns"). It is widespread in Eurasia and northwestern Africa, preferring drier habitats than other Coenonymphae. The larval host plants are grasses, notably Sheep's Fescue and rough meadow grass Poa trivialis.

Coenonympha pamphilus, Fadet commun ou Procris, Small Heath


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Sunday, January 11, 2015


Coenonympha glycerion, Fadet de la mélique ou Iphis/Semi-Procris, 
Chestnut Heath

The wing span is 25-35 millimetres. The upper surface of the female’s forewing is brighter orange, the hind wing light brown with an orange band along the edge. Wing fringes pale grey for both sexes. The wing undersides have eye patches that can be six, but sometimes fewer. The chestnut heath is regarded as a purely open landscape species, in dry as well as fresh meadows, but of course they can be seen at the favourite haunts of butterflies too – on forest roads and clearings.






read more "Coenonympha glycerion, Fadet de la mélique"
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